Musical Hit in New York: Nice Work If You Can Get It With Matthew Broderick

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Back in high school, I was honored to accept the role of a folly girl in the musical “Crazy For You.”  Honored, I say, because I can’t hold a tune to save my life, and am convinced the only thing that landed me the part was dynamite facial expressions and killer jazz hands.  Regardless, having a part in the chorus line of this adorable show was one of my best high school memories, and I played the musical’s soundtrack in my car’s CD player months after our 3 night run.  Even today, the lyrics to the musical’s hit numbers, “Nice Work If You Can Get It” and “Someone To Watch Over Me” come flowing out as easy as my jazz hands.

 

 

You can imagine my excitement when I was invited to see the Broadway production of  Nice Work if You can Get It starring Matthew Broderick and a host of other fabulous names.  There’s something about a jazz age musical that has you singing along in your seat, high-kicking your way out of the theater, and cheering for a happily ever after ending that actually comes true in all its rumble, tumble, outlandish Broadway glory.  “Nice Work” is just that…a heavenly little slice of theater that every New Yorker should indulge in.

The show is a feel-good farcical love story, bubbling over with dance numbers set to the songs of George and Ira Gershwin.  Wealthy playboy Jimmy Winter (Broderick) is about to say “I do” to his fourth wife, when he meets bootlegger Billie Bendix (Kelli O’Hara) on the eve of his wedding.  The duo dance a little ditty, sparks fly, and the audience can clearly see this pair of Roaring Twenties lovebirds will be together by the show’s finale.  After all, it’s nice work if you can get it, and Winter will certainly give it the ol’ college try!

 

 

Along with the songs, the choreography is a perfect tribute to the musicals of the good ol’ days…a sheer slap in the face to anyone who says they don’t make musicals like they used to!  I was rolling out of my seat with laughter during the prohibitionist aunt’s (Judy Kaye) chandelier swinging number “Looking For A Boy”, in which her lemonade was laced with gin and her guard was anything but up.

The chorus girls were a delicious little addition to the show…spunky flappers with cherry red lips and legs for days that carried the energy of the show from start to finish.  Not gonna lie…they made me pine for the old days of high school theater and stage makeup.  So much so, I went home after the show (high-kicking, of course), downloaded the show’s soundtrack from iTunes, and did my own little ditty in my living room.  My neighbors have “Nice Work If You Can Get It” to thank for that.

WHERE: Nice Work If You Can Get It

Imperial Theatre
249 West 45th Street
New York, New York 

 

 

Jessica Tiare Bowen
Jessica Tiare Bowen lives in the juicy Big Apple with her adorable pink-nosed chihuahua, Gillman. He's the inspiration for her first published children's book, "Park Avenue Pound Puppy." The book is the combined result of her two greatest passions: pooches and penning stories.

Her passions include art, urban hikes through Manhattan, drinking coffee with 3 creams and 6 sugars, making extremely detailed itineraries and traveling to far away places, singing along to Broadway shows, Netflix movie nights, discovering incredible treasures at Goodwill and thrift stores, and listening to stories from little people under 7 and big people over 70.

She started her career as New York City Teaching Fellow, teaching elementary school and theater arts at a special education school in the South Bronx for 6 years. She is now a Special Education School Improvement Specialist working in public schools throughout New York City. She is the Editor-In-Chief of the online New York City travel magazine, Used York City. The magazine focuses on finding the best of New York...as used by New Yorkers. She is a member of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, and an ASPCA Ambassador.

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