Testing the Adisi Tent in Taiwan

0

Our latest camping adventure in Taiwan was in Guoxing where we used a brand named Adisi, which is a Taiwanese home grown brand.

More Camping in Taiwan

The tent structure remains attached to the quick-setup frame, so you don’t have to take it down.

More Camping in Taiwan

These very clever joints fold and lock into place, making it very easy to set up the frame with the tent attached.

More Camping in Taiwan

After the frame is set up, all that remains is to install the frame components for the foyer, and then put on the rain fly.

More Camping in Taiwan

This is the tent and additional frame in the front for the foyer, awaiting the addition of the rain fly.

More Camping in Taiwan

Notice the die-cast aluminum feet on the frame.  The inner strap is the tent.  The rain fly cleverly snaps into a connector on the outside of the foot.  To be honest, after seeing this tent go up, I think this is the most intelligently designed tent I have ever seen.

More Camping in Taiwan

The rain fly is also well designed.  All zippers are covered with flaps that keep out the rain.

More Camping in Taiwan

The rain fly has 10 little pockets like this, that contain tie-downs.

More Camping in Taiwan

If you had high winds where you’re camping, these 10 tie-downs would hold the rain fly secure.

More Camping in Taiwan

As you can see, the tie-downs are provided at 2 levels: at the top and mid points of the rain fly.

More Camping in Taiwan

The foyer has 2 entrances, making it very convenient.

More Camping in Taiwan

There are tie-downs for all the inside flaps too.

More Camping in Taiwan

This is the 6-person sized tent and the foyer is very generous however they also offer a 8-person tent, which is even larger.

More Camping in Taiwan

This the the rear of the tent, after setup.  The red flap can be set up as an awning and there is also a rear entrance to the tent if you desire to use that too.  Notice the air vents up at the top.  This tent has plenty of ventilation and did not have a moisture build-up problem overnight.

More Camping in Taiwan

This is the front of the tent with the foyer.  Notice the stainless quad pod to the left.

More Camping in Taiwan

One of the more interesting things I noticed at this campsite is the Norfolk Island Pine trees. Below, the tent set up at another location.

More Camping in Taiwan

I’m not used to such high-density camping.  But for Taiwanese, this is normal.

More Camping in Taiwan

More Camping in Taiwan

The above 2 shots are of the main avenue in the center, with campsites along each side.

More Camping in Taiwan

Above and below, the Dahu Township, Miaoli.

More Camping in Taiwan

More Camping in Taiwan

As always, the food is fabulous.

More Camping in Taiwan

Cold chicken (“oil chicken”).

More Camping in Taiwan

Squid and vegetables.

More Camping in Taiwan

Bamboo soup.

More Camping in Taiwan

Fried seafood.

More Camping in Taiwan

Mountain pork.

More Camping in Taiwan

Kale.

More Camping in Taiwan

In the evening, fires were lit and food cooked.

More Camping in Taiwan

This shot shows the awning that we had to put up because of drizzling rain.  It was too low for me to walk under and quite inconvenient for cooking with the Dutch oven.

More Camping in Taiwan

All photos by MJ Klein.

MJ Klein
Former field engineer MJ Klein now lives in Taiwan, and writes articles that primarily feature photographs of travels of MJ and wife Hui-chen, plus daily goings on in the bustling island nation of Taiwan, and other places in Asia. Articles feature people, culture, food, situations and sometimes the trials and tribulations of traveling in places such as China, Hong Kong, Thailand, Laos and of course Taiwan.
Read More Share

Recent Author Posts

Join Our Community

Connect On Social Media

Most Popular Posts

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!