Mother & Son On The Road Without Technology

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Before we left on our trip to South America, things were different. I worked with technology every day. But I do remember a time before my laptop and I were fused together. I had computers, yes, but back then, I refused to own a laptop.

Why?

Because I knew myself. I owned and ran a busy a design / branding agency and I was a workaholic. I spend at least 60+ hours a week in front of my duel giga-something apples in the office loft, (which for many years also happened to where I resided).
For what reason could I possibly need a laptop too?

My fear was, I’d take the laptop into my bed and never get any separation from work, technology and being connected. I’d never have a break.

Yes. I know myself. Well.

I was a self proclaimed work-aholic for oh so many years. Prior to our travels, it was worse. I am committed, I am passionate and I am focussed. And I knew one thing for sure: Back then, I would have taken my laptop into bed with me. Without a doubt.

I bought my first laptop for our trip and for the last five years, my laptop has been my lifeline. I use my laptop to earn a living, to stay connected with friends and family and even to provide entertainment watching movies and tv shows and listening to music.

I couldn’t imagine traveling long-term without a laptop. I couldn’t work without one, support ourselves, or manage to stay connected. So, when Miro and I decided to travel to Ecuador for 10 days and we decided to both go without our personal laptop computers, it was a monumental decision for both of us. (I am not saying we didn’t use the internet cafes once a day to check in, but it was an intentional choice at that point, rather than wasting hours in front of our computers.)

montanita

So, what happened as a result of this little experiment?

Besides the obvious (not being in front of the computer all day and night) I noticed some miraculously wonderful side effects of being computer-free:

  1. We did not have to worry about leaving our valuable computers in our hostel room while we were out enjoying the beach.
  2. We spent all of our time together interacting and playing (multiple card and chess games) with one another
  3. We laughed so much together, the days seemed to be filled with nothing but laughter and joy
  4. We experienced the days as being longer and we had more time.
  5. We were more present at every meal, every interaction, every activity.
  6. We exercised creative ways to entertain ourselves; taking walks, pretending we were super-spies, drawing in the sand and making new friends.

Sometimes, you gotta just take a break.

Sometimes you gotta give yourself a few computer-free days, whether you are traveling or not.

Photo credit top photo: www.gdefon. com.

Lainie Liberti
Lainie Liberti is a recovering branding expert, who’s career once focused on creating campaigns for green - eco business, non-profits and conscious business. Dazzling clients with her high-energy designs for over 18 years, Lainie lent her artistic talents to businesses that matter.  But that was then.

In 2008, after the economy took a turn, Lainie decided to be the change (instead of a victim) and began the process of “lifestyle redesign,” a joint decision between both her and her 11-year-old son, Miro. They sold or gave away all of of their possessions in 2009 and began a life of travel, service, and exploration. Lainie and her son Miro began their open-ended adventure backpacking through Central and South America. They are slow traveling around the globe allowing inspiration to be their compass. The pair is most interested in exploring different cultures, contributing by serving, and connecting with humanity as ‘global citizens.’

Today Lainie considers herself a digital nomad who is living a location independent life. She and her son write and podcast their experiences from the road at Raising Miro on the Road of Life.
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